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What is the Fandango?

The Fandango is a lively, traditional Spanish dance, characterized by its energetic steps and vibrant music. Originating in Andalusia, it's a dance of passion and precision, often accompanied by guitars and castanets. As you explore its history and cultural significance, you'll discover a world where every rhythm tells a story. Ready to step into the dance of the Fandango?
Malcolm Tatum
Malcolm Tatum
Malcolm Tatum
Malcolm Tatum

As an eclectic blend of folk and flamenco dancing, the Fandango has deep roots in the culture that go back to the Baroque period and the royal court in Madrid, Spain. Here is some history on the development of the Fandango as both music and a dancing phenomenon that continues to this day.

The origins of Fandango dancing as well as the creation of Fandango music are sometimes understood to reach back into early Roman and Greek culture, and are sometimes associated as an erotic expression of dance that was especially popular in Rome. However, purists say that the true origins of Fandango music as well as the Fandango as a unique dance move actually begins with the presence of Italian composers in the Spanish royal court during the Baroque period. In fact, Luigi Boccherini is often credited as developing the first of a slow Fandango while in Madrid.

Man with hands on his hips
Man with hands on his hips

These blends of Spanish dancing with European sensibilities created a dance and musical accompaniment that would begin as a slow and gentle melody, then increase in tempo as the music and the dance progressed. The slow build leading to the conclusion was first created for solo dancing, but in no time involved couples dancing and created variations on the original premise. Before the century was out, the Fandango was firmly ensconced as an essential Spanish dance.

The production of Fandango music and dance is characterized by a ¾ pattern that begins with an A Minor and then progresses to an E Major. Castanets were included in the music early on and still remain an important part of the Fandango. In actual practice, the Fandango has an appearance that is not unlike tap dancing, with rapid foot movement of intentional steps that naturally lead into the next steps. An individual can perform the Fandango dance, but the dance can be performed by a couple.

In Portugal, where the Fandango has enjoyed a high profile for decades, it is not unusual to see couples of same gender as well as mixed genders perform the dance. Usually when a couple of involved in the Fandango, one partner will lead by setting the pace and the sequence of routines, and the other partner will follow. A brief interlude where a step that is sometimes referred to as dragging the feet will be used as a way of changing the lead from one partner to another. Because the dance is somewhat of a competition between the two partners to see who can perform the most eye-catching moves, the Fandango has also been used as slang for any type of quarrel or dispute that gets to be somewhat spectacular.

The Fandango has been a popular attraction in the United States for many years as well, particularly in the southwestern portion of the country. Used often in stage shows as well as part of basic dance instruction at many dancing studios, the Fandango is considered to be an essential when it comes to learning dance moves for use in polite society.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Fandango and where did it originate?

The Fandango is a lively, traditional folk and flamenco dance from Spain, characterized by its energetic steps and clapping. It originated in the Andalusia region during the 18th century and has since become an integral part of Spanish culture. The dance is often accompanied by guitars, castanets, or hand-clapping ("palmas") and is known for its passionate and rhythmic style.

How is the Fandango typically performed?

Fandango performances are dynamic and can vary, but they typically involve a couple dancing in close proximity. The dance is marked by quick steps, spirited turns, and intricate footwork. Dancers often improvise within the structure of the dance, responding to the guitar's rhythm and the intensity of the music, which can range from slow and melodic to fast and percussive.

What are the musical characteristics of a Fandango?

The music for a Fandango is usually in triple meter, which means it has a 3/4 or 6/8 time signature, giving it a distinctive waltz-like rhythm. The guitar plays a crucial role, providing both melody and rhythm through strumming patterns known as "rasgueado" and finger plucking called "picado." The tempo can vary, often starting slower and building to a faster, more fervent pace.

Are there different styles of Fandango?

Yes, there are several regional styles of Fandango across Spain and Portugal, each with unique characteristics. For example, the Fandango de Huelva is known for its lighter, more playful nature, while the Fandango Grande is more serious and dramatic. There's also a distinction between the traditional folk Fandango and the theatrical, choreographed versions seen in classical Spanish ballets.

Has the Fandango influenced other dance forms?

Indeed, the Fandango has had a significant influence on various other dance forms, especially in Latin America. For instance, the Fandango has contributed to the development of dances such as the Seguidilla in Spain and the Fandanguillo. In Mexico, the Jarabe Tapatío (Mexican Hat Dance) has been influenced by the Fandango's rhythm and style. The dance's impact is a testament to its enduring popularity and adaptability across cultures.

Malcolm Tatum
Malcolm Tatum

After many years in the teleconferencing industry, Michael decided to embrace his passion for trivia, research, and writing by becoming a full-time freelance writer. Since then, he has contributed articles to a variety of print and online publications, including MusicalExpert, and his work has also appeared in poetry collections, devotional anthologies, and several newspapers. Malcolm’s other interests include collecting vinyl records, minor league baseball, and cycling.

Learn more...
Malcolm Tatum
Malcolm Tatum

After many years in the teleconferencing industry, Michael decided to embrace his passion for trivia, research, and writing by becoming a full-time freelance writer. Since then, he has contributed articles to a variety of print and online publications, including MusicalExpert, and his work has also appeared in poetry collections, devotional anthologies, and several newspapers. Malcolm’s other interests include collecting vinyl records, minor league baseball, and cycling.

Learn more...

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      Man with hands on his hips